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Gary McAvoy has turned his mind and expertise to many pursuits in life, and has been a working writer through all of it. Skills honed in his twenties—writing columns for a small-town weekly newspaper and articles for a regional Southern California magazine—laid a foundation for corporate communications work supporting his own and clients' businesses, and later to authoring nonfiction books. Fascination with cryptology and intelligence during his U.S. Army tour in Germany triggered Gary’s lifelong entrepreneurial interests blending communications with information technology.

Following his years of military service, Gary built a number of successful ventures in Southern California before being drawn to the Pacific Northwest in the 1990s by the promise of its burgeoning software industry. His immersion with startups in that field led to leadership positions with the Washington Software Alliance and his first book, Cracking the New Economy: Business Tools for the Entrepreneur, with his passion for literary works and historical collectibles forming engaging side interests. 

As it often is with entrepreneurs, each of Gary's endeavors spilled over into the next to create intriguing opportunities. Among these was meeting and working with world-renowned primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall, which fostered a close and lasting bond that led to their collaborative work on Harvest for Hope: A Guide to Mindful Eating and years of volunteer work on behalf of the Jane Goodall Institute, and later, the Seattle Humane Society.

A lifelong collector of handwritten documents spanning fields of history, literature, and entertainment, in 1998 Gary launched Vintage Memorabilia, where he gained a following as a reputable dealer of first edition books and vintage letters and manuscripts. It was here where the many strands of interest and accomplishment that marked his various ventures over the years blended in a complex and thoroughly unexpected weave, when in 2012 a client approached Gary with an intriguing historical consignment that would form the basis for his latest book, And Every Word Is True, a fresh look at the investigation of the 1959 Clutter murder case made famous in Truman Capote’s book In Cold Blood.

1962 letter from Truman Capote to KBI Special Agent Harold Nye